Lee Eldridge is Unlocking Ag

After landing a job in Canberra, it wasn’t long before Lee figured out the farm life was the only one he wanted to live.

DelayPay and Farm Tender chat to Lee about the happenings on his small farm and where he sees his livestock business going.

Originally from his family’s small farm where they had poddy calves and a few sheep, Lee is now situated on his own small farm in Young, NSW.

“It’s just myself here, and I feedlot sheep and cattle.”

The last few years for Lee have been up and down, just like most.

“It’s been tough with the rain, but you learn to live with it. You’ve just got to be smarter, not necessarily work harder but think smart.”

The recent rain has made it over Lee’s way, thankfully, and just last week he received 75mm.

“It just goes around in cycles: it’s dry for a while then it’s wet, and then it’s dry again and eventually the rain comes back.”

Lee says he’s excited to keep his small operation going, and the only place he has to go is up.

“The world is a big place and they all want Australia protein – that’s where my sheep and cattle come in!" 

Lee describes his job as “supplying the world with meat”. The majority of his livestock goes to export, and he sees a big future in this.

He thoroughly enjoys working for himself, and it’s that element that makes this lifestyle the only one for him, along with the constant connection to the land.

What is the one thing that if done right, could move the needle for Lee? 

It’s all about coordinating the business around the weather to make the most of it, explains Lee.

“You learn to live with it. I buy most of my stock in October through to December, the dryer period, and I need to carry it through to the winter market, which can be hard.”

Lee exudes optimism, though, and it’s these tactful decisions that keep moving.

What does Lee keep top of mind to survive the next 30 years in ag?

“We’ve got to keep our exports alive.

“If we lose trade with this coronavirus, the sheep or cattle market could drop. Everything is governed on exports.”

If Lee were talking to his younger self, what advice would he give?

“I’d probably go back and do things a bit differently. You learn as you go, though – each day you learn something new.

“Each year’s been different, there’s never one year the same – especially with livestock prices.”

What has Lee’s experience been with Farm Tender and DelayPay

Lee attends a lot of clearing sales then re-sells the equipment and machinery on Farm Tender. Some weeks he sells between 7-10 items on the site.

He also used DelayPay to buy a new tractor recently.

“Both the businesses are great.”

Lee saw the opportunity in DelayPay as an avid user of Farm Tender. Sound like something you want in on? Get in touch with us today.

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